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Grade Level, 2014
Tracking Online Education in the United States

Survey by I. Elaine Allen and Jeff Seaman, Babson Survey Research Group.
Proudly sponsored by Pearson, this annual survey is designed, administered and analyzed by the Babson Survey Research Group, with data collection conducted in partnership with the College Board and additional data from the National Center for Education Statistics’ Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).
Using both IPEDS data and responses from more than 2,800 colleges and universities, this study is aimed at answering fundamental questions about the nature and extent of online education in the United States.

Click each item below to reveal more information

70.8% of CAOs agree

that online education is critical to the
long-term strategy of their institution.

Online education is critical to the long-term strategy of my institution Fall 2002 to Fall 2014.

of juveniles who face trial are illiterate, tying illiteracy to crime.

of juveniles who face trial are illiterate, tying illiteracy to crime.

How do online learning outcomes 
compare to face-to-face?

The percent of academic leaders rating learning outcomes in online education as the same, or superior to those in face-to-face remained unchanged at 74.1%.

2/3 of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of fourth grade will end up in jail or on welfare.

2014 saw an increase in the number of CAOs ranking learning outcomes in online as “the same” to face-to-face instruction (54.1% to 57.9%).

1 in 4
children in the U.S. grow up without learning to read

Academic leaders are far more positive about the learning outcomes for blended instruction than they are for online.

Online Growth in Public & Private
Non-profit Institutions

School suspension and expulsion
the risk of entering the school-to-prison pipeline.

Public and private non-profit institutions recorded higher levels of distance enrollment growth (4.6% and 12.6%), but these were offset by a decrease among for-profit institutions.

What is the awareness of
Open Educational Resources (OER)?

Academic leader awareness of OER far exceeded that of faculty awareness.

“While the rapid pace of online learning growth has moderated, it still accounts for nearly three-quarters of all U.S. higher education’s enrollment increases last year.” 

[Jeff Seaman, Co-author and Co-Director of the Babson Survey Research Group]

Growth of distance enrollments
continued to decline, settling at

3.7%

between Fall 2012 and Fall 2013.

How are Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) faring?

Only 8% of higher education institutions currently offer a MOOC. 

Academic leaders who believe that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses dropped to 16.3%.

Many institutions report they are still undecided about MOOCs, while the single largest group (46.5%) say they have no plans for a MOOC.

Assessment of 
learning outcomes continues to rank

as a leading impact on the future
of higher education.

Explore efficacy in education at

efficacy.pearson.com

What is the future 
of online learning?

Academic leaders think that cost and gainful employment are the factors with the greatest impact on the future of higher education.

Learn more

about Pearson’s online learning services at: www.pearsononlinelearning.com

Download the complete survey report & infographic:

Download
This report remains independent through the support of Pearson, Tyton Partners and the Online Learning Consortium. Copyright ©2015 by Babson Survey Research Group, Pearson, and Quahog Research Group, LLC.  Permission is hereby granted for all non-commercial use of this infographic, provided notification is given to bsrg@babson.edu and proper attribution is included.  Commercial use is typically granted.

Grade Level, 2014
Tracking Online Education in the United States

Survey by I. Elaine Allen and Jeff Seaman, Babson Survey Research Group.

Proudly sponsored by Pearson, this annual survey is designed, administered and analyzed by the Babson Survey Research Group, with data collection conducted in partnership with the College Board and additional data from the National Center for Education Statistics’ Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS).
Using both IPEDS data and responses from more than 2,800 colleges and universities, this study is aimed at answering fundamental questions about the nature and extent of online education in the United States.

Click each item below to reveal more information

70.8% of CAOs agree

that online education is critical to the long-term strategy of their institution.

Online education is critical to the long-term strategy of my institution Fall 2002 to Fall 2014.

of juveniles
who face trial are illiterate, tying illiteracy to crime.
of juveniles
who face trial
are illiterate,
tying illiteracy
to crime.

How do online learning outcomes compare to face-to-face?

The percent of academic leaders rating learning outcomes in online education as the same, or superior to those in face-to-face remained unchanged at 74.1%.

2/3 of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of fourth grade will end up in jail or on welfare.

2014 saw an increase in the number of CAOs ranking learning outcomes in online as “the same” to face-to-face instruction (54.1% to 57.9%).

Academic leaders are far more positive about the learning outcomes for blended instruction than they are for online.

School suspension and expulsion
the risk of entering the school-to-prison pipeline.

Online Growth in Public & Private
Non-profit Institutions

Public and private non-profit institutions recorded higher levels of distance enrollment growth (4.6% and 12.6%), but these were offset by a decrease among for-profit institutions.

What is the awareness of
Open Educational Resources (OER)?

Academic leader awareness of OER resources far exceeded that of faculty awareness.

“While the rapid pace of online learning growth has moderated, it still accounts for nearly three-quarters of all U.S. higher education’s enrollment increases last year.” 

[Jeff Seaman, Co-author and Co-Director of the Babson Survey Research Group]

Growth of distance enrollments
continued to decline, settling at

3.7%

between Fall 2012 and Fall 2013.

How are Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) faring?

Only 8% of higher education institutions currently offer a MOOC. 

Academic leaders who believe that MOOCs represent a sustainable method for offering online courses dropped to 16.3%.

Many institutions report they are still undecided about MOOCs, while the single largest group (46.5%) say they have no plans for a MOOC.

Assessment of 
learning outcomes continues to rank

as a leading impact on the future
of higher education.

Explore efficacy in education at

efficacy.pearson.com

What is the future 
of online learning?

Academic leaders think that cost and gainful employment are the factors with the greatest impact on the future of higher education.

Download the complete survey report
& infographic:

Download

Learn more

about Pearson’s online learning services at:

www.pearsononlinelearning.com
Together we can transform student achievement and drive results.

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